Web Services

Control and configuration of a Loxone system is possible through simple HTTP commands

EASY COMMUNICATION

With Web Services and simple HTTP commands, you can retrieve information, and create or modify settings using Loxone’s Miniserver.

CONTENTS

GENERAL

  • Structure of Web Services

STATUS & CONTROL

  • Query: Status of a control
  • Push-button
  • Query: All output changes

CONFIGURATION & STATISTICS

  • PLC Commands
  • Configuration Commands
  • Statistics Commands

GENERAL

THE STRUCTURE OF WEB SERVICES

(Using RESTful Web Services technology)

http://User:Password@addressMiniserver/command/control/value

  • control: can be any input or output, real or virtual. Outputs can only be used for status requests.
  • value: when ‘value’ is not available, the current control value is returned. The following values ??allowed: ‘A’, ‘On’, ‘off’, ‘Off’, ‘Impulse’, ‘Pulse’ or a decimal value (<1).
  • Virtual digital inputs with 2 outputs (up-down, left-right, starting from version 1.5.4.16), the following values are allowed.
WEb services.png
  • ‘On’ = 1 and ‘Off’ = 0 for digital inputs and outputs.
  • Analogue (0-10V) inputs operate in a range between 0 and 10.00. There is no formal limit (for example EIB temperatures of 21.5 or -5.2).
  • A dot is used for the decimal output.

Example – Pulse Input

Before sending a pulse into the system, your Miniserver needs a Virtual Input that will accept the command.

Loxone_Web_services.png

Now once we have our Virtual Input added and saved into the Miniserver, the command will need to be sent. Below is an example of a 3rd party application* sending a pulse command into the Loxone Miniserver:

Loxone_Web_services2.png

 

In this example we have the default credentials (username: admin, password: admin) and the virtual input in the command which has the name ‘Test Input’. By pressing the ‘Send’ button in the application, the string will use the IP address to find the Miniserver on the network, login and then process the command.

If the send command is accepted, the returned response in an XML format will be:

Loxone_Web_services3.png

 

Code “200” means the command was accepted and processed.

You will also see in Loxone Config the Virtual Input light up for a split second if ‘Live View’ is active: 

Loxone_Web_services4.png

*In these examples, Postman is the 3rd party app being used to send the commands.

STATUS & CONTROL

QUERY: STATUS OF A CONTROL

Loxone_Web_services5.png

Example – Push Button

Before sending a command into the system, your Miniserver needs a Push Button function block that will accept the command.

Loxone_push_button.png

 

Now once we have our Push Button added and saved into the Miniserver, the command will need to be sent. Below is an example of a 3rd party application* sending an ‘On’ command into the Loxone Miniserver:

Loxone_Web_services6.png

 

In this example we have the default credentials (username: admin, password: admin) and the Push Button in the command which has the name ‘Push-Button’. By pressing the ‘Send’ button in the application, the string will use the IP address to find the Miniserver on the network, login and then process the command. We can change the last part of the command to be ‘On’ or ‘Off’, depending on different situations.

If the send command is accepted, the returned response in an XML format will be:

Loxone_Web_services_comand.png

 

Code “200” means the command was accepted and processed.

You will also see in the Loxone Interface the Push Button will change state depending on which command is sent (on/off).

Loxone_push_button2.png

 

*In these examples, Postman is the 3rd party app being used to send the commands.

QUERY: ALL OUTPUT CHANGES

Loxone_Web_services_table1.png

CONFIGURATION AND STATISTICS

PLC COMMANDS

Loxone_Web_services_table2.png

CONFIGURATION COMMANDS

Loxone_Web_services_table3.png

SYSTEM COMMANDS

Loxone_Web_services_table4.png
Loxone_Web_services_table5.png
Loxone_Web_services_table6.png
Loxone_Web_services_table7.png